Screen Shot 2018-02-13 at 20.32.34that the selling point


meant “made before 1935” …

Quoting now—

Army Sergeant C.W. Arrowood completely agreed: “The Jap knee mortar gives us hell. They come in fast, thick, and accurate. Can’t we have one?”

The answer to Sergeant Arrowood’s question was a resounding No. United States forces soldiered on with the little loved rifle grenade until the advent of the M79 40mm grenade launcher during the early stages of the Vietnam War.

sourced:  CLICK HERE

—reraises an old bugbear of mine, having suffered years of obsolete and obsolescent junk (of which the warehouses were full).

I find myself asking over and over and over again … “Why can’t the designers, manufacturers, and procurers of weaponry be drafted into the forces as ‘coal face’ USERS of said equipments?” for substantial genuine (field) testing?


is best served always by getting the end user to evaluate products under user conditions; and not at all ‘served’ by pen-pushers and crony business/politicians in luxury air conditioned offices discussing over cocktail lunches.

But Mr Warbucks (love that name!) wouldn’t agree. And for many millions of deceased warriors, what might their families say if they only knew~?

Here’s a nice bugbear to help you think finger-pointing-down-animation-gif copy

Bugbear big.png

“Always expect the unexpected! Got it, yet, Shorty?”

AND if you have any manner of ‘flesh and blood’ input in your nation’s defence forces—be you Brit, Yank, Russki, or whatever:

how would you feel about getting your relative back in a wee box (if you even got the bugger back at all) discovering later that when dropped in the mud briefly his/her weapon ceased functioning (but rarely the bad guy’s weapons? Weird, that)?

Screen Shot 2018-02-13 at 20.32.34



16 point 5

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 00.13.01.pngMINUTES

out of a lifetime. So?

I’ve just sat through an impassioned speech by a young lady whom some might call a firebrand (or a bitch). Whichever, however, the lady is involved in her topic. Kudos.

Essentially her topic is Canada.

And immigration, and the fact that she likes being herself. (Don’t we all?)

She doesn’t like being forced to ‘like’ people with different values being foisted on her (and I suppose on her downlines too if she has any).

Her u-tube is well worth watching—

—even if you don’t don’t give a damn. Why should you? Isn’t ‘change’ the only constant? So why dislike the inevitable, why kick against the pricks when life is so much easier if you just go with the flow?


I try to make rational sense of what is being done to my way of life without my consent. I have my own values and dislike what I see as other peoples’ lack of values overriding mine in my own country. Hence I relate to the lady above.


I have a token in my home (somewhere) from when I did time in HMAS Cerberus. The motto was ‘SEMPER VIGILANS’.

Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 20.05.34.png

Pretty self explanatory … and tonight I was tracking through a train of thought triggered by GP’s recent post on HMAS Australia and ended up with a modern souvenir image of Cerberus, and now look at it—

Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 20.07.33.png

Papatoetoe_High_School_logo.pngRelated … a few weeks ago I visited the website of a South Auckland school, where the blazer/badge image was of an ancient Grecian athlete holding aloft a burning torch, with the motto “Digne Lampada Tradas” which as everyone once knew was “Worthily, hand on the torch” …

… but which has likewise been modernised in translation to now be understood as meaning something quite different—


Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 20.15.39.png


So understandably moderns are too dense to appreciate subtleties—and why the hell waste time on deceased archaic obsolete defunct meaningless languages?

Is this why the Christian Bible is translated endlessly into ‘Noddy book’ turns of phrase, lest the simplest of simple messages be lost upon the illegitim illiterates?

But if nothing is sacred, what then provides continuity from one generation to the next?

What defines selfhood, nationhood, community?

What can give a sense of purpose, unity, and the bondings that such provide?

Or are we being set up?

Are clever minds invoking the ages old



against us?

And we, being incapable of reasoned thought, are simply accepting it?

At least the passionate damsel in the video above has seen the light. Too little, too late, but I’d be happy to watch her again. And I shall …


Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 08.12.34




Screen Shot 2017-11-27 at 17.39.43.png

and I’m left scratching. All over …

“…The film also details the story of Lamarr as an inventor. “She came up with a secure communication system that was really about helping the Allies beat the Nazis in the Atlantic,” Dean said. “Wireless torpedoes were being blown up by Nazi ‘wolfpacks.’”

Lamarr worked to create a system called “frequency hopping” in which torpedoes would “hop” between frequencies to avoid detection …”

source:  CLICK HERE 

The ‘Lamarr’ referred to is of course Hedy, film star (boom boom~!) of a few years back. I had no idea that she was the slightest bit technical but there ya go. I also had no idea the wolfpacks could capture control of allied torpedoes so it’s learning curves all round.

Screen Shot 2017-11-27 at 20.09.15.png


lines of thought triggered by the above ref’d article, I came upon this gem—

The Kriegsmarine and Royal Navy promptly identified and eliminated the problems. In the United States Navy, there was an extended wrangle over the problems plaguing the Mark 14 torpedo (and its Mark 6 exploder). Cursory trials had allowed bad designs to enter service. Both the Navy Bureau of Ordnance and the United States Congress were too busy protecting their own interests to correct the errors, and fully functioning torpedoes only became available to the USN twenty-one months into the Pacific War.[33]

source:  CLICK HERE 

—forcing once again this plaintive bleat: that in times of active unpleasantness the guys responsible for the procurement of vital equipments must be made to accompany them into the field:

Their invention was granted a patent … and at that time the U.S. Navy was not receptive to considering inventions coming from outside the military.[22] Only in 1962  … did an updated version of their design appear on Navy ships.[29]

Think of Self Interest as a wee bit of essential Quality Assurance if you like—there’s nothing quite like it for real motivation.





can be a shock. (Especially when some misfit makes admissions~TUT!)


are the definitive World beaters at absolutely everything. It’s a fact we imbibe at our mothers’ bottle, one we learn from educational Ground Zero (day one at school) and the lesson is reinforced everywhere—

“Mr Argus, Sir?”

“Yes, little Virginia?”

“Can we really be the best worst too?”

“… … us kiwis can do anything, Kid.”

Now, where were we?

Oh, yes—today’s quote—

According to analysis carried out by NZ Initiative researcher Sam Warburton, the chance of a car occupant dying on the road was 41 per cent higher than it was in 2013, and 12 per cent higher than last year.

So, what’s going on? Is it smartphones? Is it a lack of proper driver training? Is it foreign drivers? Not wearing seatbelts? Unsafe vehicles? Alcohol? Drugs? Road condition? Speed? Experts are struggling to answer these questions, and the Ministry of Transport has undertaken at least three studies into the road toll since 2013 which have led to nothing definitive.

to read from source:  CLICK HERE 

Struggling to answer—and they are experts?

Here’s more from the same non-expert—

We’re quick to blame tourists for accidents, but ask tourists what they think of us behind the wheel. The feedback is consistent. We are angry, tail-gating, intolerant, ill-mannered monsters who view our vehicles as an extension of our……selves.


… and I just love it …


My opinions? Oh really? Gosh …

So I shan’t venture my opinion. I’ll just give advice—


On our roads treat everyone

as if

they are out to kill you

given any opportunity


—and you won’t go too far wrong.

Actually, you won’t be too far wrong … (not for long, anyway).


falls off a pale horse


OH …


This isn’t in accordance with Hollywood hype or Trump’s trumpetings—

The US Navy in the Pacific has a problem.

Not only has it lost two of its most advanced air defence destroyers to avoidable collisions at a time of intense regional tensions, there are reports its crews are on the brink of exhaustion – and revolt.

The Navy Times has revealed a catastrophic collapse of morale aboard the key guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh – one of only a handful of ships capable of engaging North Korea’s ballistic missiles.

“If we went to war I felt like we would have been killed easily and there are (people) on board who wanted it to happen so we could just get it over with,” one sailor wrote.

“It’s only a matter of time before something horrible happens,” another predicts in an anonymous survey of the Japan-based USS Shiloh’s mission preparedness.

But these are just a few words among a flurry of expressions of discontent:

“Our sailors do not trust the CO.”

The ship’s a “floating prison”.

“I just pray we never have to shoot down a missile from North Korea … because then our ineffectiveness will really show.”

Depression. Suicidal thoughts. Exhaustion. Despair.

The cause?

Micromanagement. Command dysfunction. Excessive punishments.

Some even say they had been confined to the ‘brig’ on bread and water rations for simple on-the-job mistakes.

The responses are being seen as a warning that the stressed US 7th Fleet may not be up to the task of deterring North Korea, China and Russia amid a multitude of regional stand-offs.

“Members, especially leaders, are so worn out, beat down, and overworked, that they are almost incapable of being effective,” one sailor wrote.

for source (NZH): CLICK HERE

—and doesn’t sound good at all. Is this a case of misleading disinformation, or is it for real? If true, then is it a case of ‘generation Snowflake meets Captain Bligh’ … or should the fleet be sorted out properly?

Given that one snowflake doth not a winter make I scanned a failing memory … and no, I’ve never been anything but favourably impressed with the US navy that I’ve met. So perhaps, as Hamlet mused “Something is rotten in the state of …”


This is pure surmisation here— the US forces would be better served to dig up and clone the late Captain McGonagle of the USS Liberty. (Make enough clones to serve the entire executive of the US Navy.)


has to be: Are we concerned here with one or two instances, or something widespread that even right now will be is the subject of frantic ‘ass covering’ activity?

I think the standard approach is to go aboard the ships concerned and over tea and bikkies ask the officers.

Or go to the bases and over tea and bikkies ask the officers.

Or go to any installation and over tea and bikkies ask the officers …


do the Americans still have a navy? (Got lots of ships, though—got some very impressive aircraft carriers and rail guns and magLevs and stuff.)

They do have a few fleets … but are they fleets of Liberties, or Bedfords?



If you haven’t seen it be warned, a wee bit dated now. But from the looks of things it could well be germane to the issue … (and is still a good dit*) .

“Americans,” my father used to say with sad affection, “are great people. But sadly they believe their own propaganda.”

Perhaps the NZH article is propaganda too. But it has the Ring Of Truth (ROT) that gives it credibility.

Perhaps the White House should take charge—you know, set up a few dozen unlimited Investigation Committees, dwell a decent pause and then sack a few thousand disgruntled gobs. Promote a few officers to flag rank, give the entire officer corps some medals—even strike new ones if needed—

—and get Hollywood to resurrect ‘The Sand Pebbles’ …



*  I got my copy via Amazon.


After reading this—dodo

“What happens should nuclear war occur is a total unknown, he said.

It would almost certainly result in hundreds of thousands, if not millions of deaths, with devastation on an unprecedented scale …”

sourced:  CLICK HERE 


—one might ask

  • how bad were the ice ages
  • and the asteroidal impacts that created them?
  • Created? Or remediated?

Bugger … I need more coffee.

Web Troll



3 gerbils


A quote from an RN submariner —

“…and there I was, Kirov square in my sights … with sonar that ensonifies the entire ocean but never tells its operators a thing!” etc etc.



make your own connections.

The Brits have just taken delivery of their lovely new aircraft carrier. Two such when the dust and feathers have settled. I’m quite impressed.


being in no position to form judgement I’m still allowed unfounded ‘gut feeling’ feelings of misgivings.


I seem to recall that on two different occasions Chinese submarines popped up unexpectedly in the middle of US carrier fleets. Possibly a variation on the old “Oops, I think I’m a bit lost, can you show me where I am on the map, please?”


that the Yanks borrowed a Swedish submarine with crew for some exercises and the (Gotland class?) submarine made a mockery of their defences—

Screen Shot 2017-08-17 at 17.21.35.png

I looked it up and will re-read the article. (Could even be tail-tweaking by some prankish blogger.)

Pretty little thing.



—but enough admiring, let’s move to my point:

Floating airfields are all very well and good for projecting power against some inoffensive little oik who can’t fight back. Vietcong chappies shivering under trees being pounded by naval Phantoms dropping napalm all over them … ideal, no?


the oik has Gotlands or something comparable, in the right place at the right time?



but I imagine that one could get half a dozen subs for the cost of one seagoing metropolis.

But there is a drawback—a lovely big freshly washed and brushed super-carrier coming in shows an awesome amount of flag compared to any number of submerged submarines ‘out there somewhere‘.


rightly or wrongly voted ‘big and visible is better’.

Hence the new QE—

Screen Shot 2017-08-17 at 16.41.32.png


that one day we may get to find out. I hope not.

Personally I’d vote submarine—but then, I don’t have to live in the blasted things …



… although living in the other things could get a bit unpleasant too. Bugger, it’s a tough call.

But I still vote submarine … unless, of course, you actually can protect your investment in many acres of steel.